Pathway to Miyo-Pimâtisiwin is a network of community-based agencies, people with lived-experience, Elders, and vested governmental agencies collaborating to provide our communities with equal access to supports. Our mission is to provide a collaborative and community-led initiative to combat the social factors that reposition some to street-based lifestyles; decrease social violence; and promote community healing. Our vision is for safe, healthy communities, where all citizens are valued and have equal access to meaningful supports, connections, and avenues to healing.

Pathway to Miyo-Pimâtisiwin acknowledges the devastating effects incarceration can have on mental health. Paired with COVID-19, it is no secret inmates around the world are grappling with the new realities of their physical and mental health over and above their imprisonment. We do not need to look far to find stories of grief, loss and sorrow around the world stemming from COVID-19 and related pandemic burnout, but with all these stories of sadness, there are also complementary stories of resilience, kindness, healing, and hope. Yet, so many of these stories leave out the voices of incarcerated people from the narrative, the majority of whom identify as BIPOC.

Art work for the Altogether Gallery: Through Prison Eyes by C. Slippery.

Pathway to Miyo-Pimâtisiwin has developed a virtual art gallery as a means to give those who are incarcerated a chance to showcase how COVID-19 has impacted them and tell the personal story of their mental health journey through art, writing, beading and other available mediums. Our intent was to create a space to give incarcerated individuals agency over their experiences and provide opportunity to connect with the community through art and story.

Art work for the Altogether Gallery: Through Prison Eyes by Tanya Sayer.

To kick-start the virtual art gallery, we held two contests: one to choose the name of the gallery and a second to submit artwork for the gallery. Through these contests, we arrived at the name of “Altogether Gallery: Through Prison Eyes”, which was a combination of two submissions by Julie McAdams and Gary Iron. The artwork chosen to represent the gallery was also by Julie McAdam and her piece titled “Through Prison Eyes” beautifully represents the gallery name.

Art work for the Altogether Gallery: Through Prison Eyes by Ceekay Bird.

Our hope is to see online art galleries such as this become more common within prison systems, as providing individuals who are incarcerated the opportunity to show the world their talent and beauty is critical to keeping that connection to community alive. Not only did inmates have the ability to receive payment for their skills and expertise, but they were also able to tell their stories, connect with culture, have their voice amplified, and take advantage of healthy ways to support their healing journey.

You can see all entries in the art gallery at the following link:

Our hope is to see online art galleries such as this become more common within prison systems, as providing individuals who are incarcerated the opportunity to show the world their talent and beauty is critical to keeping that connection to community alive. Not only did inmates have the ability to receive payment for their skills and expertise, but they were also able to tell their stories, connect with culture, have their voice amplified, and take advantage of healthy ways to support their healing journey.

Pathway to Miyo-Pimâtisiwin would like to thank the following artists who submitted work to our gallery and allowed us to share their experiences, with COVID-19 and incarceration.

  • Ricky Kayson
  • Juice the Savage
  • Ty Sangwais
  • Tanya Sayer                                       
  • Reece Fiddler                                    
  • Corey Slippery
  • Candace Lacheur                               
  • Carlos Tom                                        
  • Jasmine Ahpay
  • Chantelle Bird                                    
  • Tanya Deschamps                             
  • Savanneh Denton
  • Melissa MacQueen                            
  • Julie McAdam                                   
  • Curtis Morin
  • Jordan Baptiste                                  
  • Mike Scramstad                                 
  • JT ShaOulle
  • Iron Gray                                           
  • Francis Sylvestre

Furthermore, Pathway to Miyo-Pimâtisiwin would like to thank all those involved in the creation and implementation of this project. If it were not for your interest, dedication, and time this would not have been possible.

  • Stan Tu’Inukuafe                               
  • Marilyn Stone                        
  • Chelsea Roy
  • Andi Zografi                                      
  • Kylie Frass                            
  • Amanda Richter-Goddard
  • Carter Lovelace                                 
  • Alyssa Marinos                      
  • Richard Dubois

John Howard Society of Saskatchewan is grateful to have had the opportunity to work with such an amazing group of people on this important project. Please share the link with your friends and family.

Episode Summary

There’s nothing quite like a mother’s love for her child. It’s fierce. Protective. The perfect mix of strength and softness blended together. On today’s episode, two mothers share their stories about what it’s like to have a child in prison and the lengths they will go to support them. We explore the impact of incarceration on families, specifically in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak and the love a mother has for her son.

You can listen at the following link, or download anywhere you listen to podcasts: https://knowjustice.simplecast.com/episodes/love-in-the-time-of-covid

Episode Notes

Special thanks to Julie Paul and Stella Cote for sharing their stories with us. Their courage is inspiring and we stand with you.

Thank you to Night Kinistino for your incredible poetry reading. It was beautiful, and we are grateful!

Credit to Jayda Taylor and CTV News Saskatoon for the audio news clip about the riot at Prince Albert Correctional Centre.

You can read more about the protest here: Mothers return to Regina Correctional Centre, dance in support of inmates.

Please subscribe and rate our podcast on whichever listening platform you use. You can connect with us any time on FacebookInstagramTwitter and LinkedIn

If you have any suggestions, topic or guest ideas, or are just looking to connect, please send us a direct message on any one of our social media platforms.

During Restorative Justice Week, we are highlighting community champions that embody the principles and practice of restorative justice in our Province.

Helen Smith-McIntrye has been a tireless advocate for the disenfranchised and downtrodden throughout her life. We’ve chosen to honour her as we’ve seen her efforts to bring justice to the people we serve and the communities she is part of.

Helen Smith-McIntyre

Helen spent 20 years employed in the field at Saskatoon Community Mediation Services, living the philosophy of restorative justice by putting it into practice each and every day. She continues to follow that passion for mediation work as a volunteer with St. Thomas Wesley United Church, where she helps to facilitate a Restorative Justice circle.

Helen also has a passion for supporting refugees, having spent time as Chair of the Saskatoon Refugee Coalition and as a trainer with the Refugee Sponsorship Training Program. Helen has also spent time as Chair of the Saskatchewan Restorative Justice Network, leading and coordinating efforts to bring Restorative Justice principles and practices to our Province. She has also worked with Amnesty International, a global non-profit focused on fighting injustice and for human rights.

Saskatchewan would not be what it is without Helen Smith-McIntyre. Thank you, Helen, for all that you mean to our Province and the city of Saskatoon!

During Restorative Justice Week, we are highlighting community champions that embody the principles and practice of restorative justice in our Province.

Today, we are pleased to recognize the husband and wife team of Richard (not pictured) and Susan Ulmer of Susan Ulmer Addiction Services. They run one of our key partner agencies in Regina, connecting clients to support when they are ready to address their addiction issues. SUAS is a 22-Day Intensive Outpatient Treatment program. This program is designed to allow clients to attend school, work or look after their families. This program deals with your guilts and resentments, drinking and using history, and the cost of your addiction. The Outpatient program is followed by a 20-hour Relapse Prevention Program. This program is designed to deal with people, places, and things that can take the client back out using. Their mission is to provide confidential, compassionate treatment and to allow clients the ability to heal and become a proactive member of society.

Richard and Susan support our mutual clients free of charge through their Addiction and Relapse Prevention programming! The way they support their clients is remarkable. Richard and Susan are very professional and caring individuals. They create great relationships with the people they serve and we regularly hear how well everyone is treated during their time with this agency! They have not stopped serving their clients throughout this pandemic, recognizing how important it is for their clients to get the counseling and support that they offer!

We have partnered with them in our Liberty Lodge Justice Housing program, connecting clients to their services, as well as offering space in our housing program for their clients. Richard and Susan are amazing people that offer so much for the community and very much deserve praise for the work they do. Thank you Richard and Susan Ulmer!

During Restorative Justice Week, we want to highlight community champions that embody the principles and practice of restorative justice in our Province.

Edna Bruce has lived in Prince Albert her entire life. She has been married to her husband Jim for 43 years, and has 3 children that are all grown up, along with 13 grandkids and 2 great grandkids!

Edna Bruce

She has worked at the YWCA Prince Albert for 32 years and has been managing the Our House program the past 13 years. Edna is such an asset to the community of Prince Albert. She works with those living in homelessness and offers her support and guidance to those in need of housing. Edna is kind, caring, and fair. She is a generous soul who has a heart of gold, and shares this with everyone she meets.

Thank you for being a champion for Restorative Justice, Edna! You are very deserving of this recognition, and are grateful to call you a partner of the John Howard Society of Saskatchewan!