Saskatoon Services

There are many services and residential options for individuals in Saskatoon.

Fine Options

Fine Options provides an alternative to paying out of pocket for certain fines. People are registered through one of our branches and then placed in a volunteer work arrangement with one of our community partners where they go to work off their fine.   John Howard Society of Saskatchewan is the largest Fine Options provider in the province matching more than 2500 people with volunteer placements last year totaling more than 140,00 hours of volunteer support in the community.

Community Outreach Support Program

This program provides support for difficult to serve youth between the ages of 16-21. Services include: education, employment, addictions, crisis intervention, counseling, housing, advocacy, mentorship, transportation, and recreation. Moreover, support workers ensure that medical and mental health needs are being met.

Community Outreach Flyer

Mediation

We run our Mediation (Extrajudicial Sanctions) program under a contract with Saskatchewan’s Ministry of Justice, Corrections and Policing to provide an alternative measure to the regular court processes. Referrals to this program come from the Provincial and Federal Crown Prosecution Office.

Our mediation program applies the principals of restorative justice by emphasizing youth take responsibility for their actions and acknowledging the impact on victims. The mediation process considers key questions like who’s been hurt? what are their needs? and whose responsibility is it to meet those needs? And then involves all parties in the process toward a restorative outcome.

One result of a successful mediation process is the withdraw of charges, meaning the youth offender does not receive a youth criminal record.

Community Service Order Program

Convicted youth may receive Community Service Hours as part of their release/probation, ordered by a Youth Court Judge. The John Howard Society meets with the youth and then finds a suitable community placement where they can work to complete their community service hours. Progress and completion are monitored and reported back to the Ministry of Justice, Corrections and Policing.

StopLift Program

StopLift is a theft reduction education program for youth who have committed an act of shoplifting. StopLift works in both group and individual settings depending on the circumstances. Youth participates in discussion that examines the reasons for theft. Together with our caseworkers, youth develops strategies to make better choices in the future and look at ways to deal with temptation and peer pressure. Videos, presenters, and workbooks are used throughout the program to enhance the learning experience. Referrals for StopLift come from Youth Court, Youth Probation, schools, parents, etc.

A youth does not have to be charged to complete the program, and community referrals are welcome.

Chill Out Program

Chill Out is an interactive anger management course for youth who may be experiencing problems with anger, stress, and aggression. They may face assault charges, uttering threats, or other aggressive offenses that require Chill IMG_3320Out as part of their meditation.

IMG_3321Other referrals to this program come from schools, parents and other concerned members of the community. Chill Out is designed to help youth talk about their triggers, their types of anger, and techniques for controlling and venting anger in healthy ways.

Videos, presenters, group discussions, and workbooks are used throughout the program to enhance the learning experience. Like StopLift, Chill Out can be completed in a group setting or one-on-one, based on the youth’s needs and availability. The program can be designed to include bullying information and workbooks based charges, the needs of the client, and the request from parents and teachers.

                                                                         

Saskatoon Residential Options

JHSS Social programs provide housing and community support to youth ages 12 – 21 years. The Social Programs work in partnership with MSS and neighboring youth supportive organizations to provide a community of care to some of Saskatoon’s most venerable people. Within the Social Programs youth requiring a very high level of support, a moderate level of support, and those preparing to live independently are able to access supports. In Saskatoon our Social Programs start with our Bert’s Safe Shelter, Basswood Place, Jays Place, Cedar House and SIL. Integrated into our housing and community connections is are our Community Outreach services.

Supported Independent Living Program (SIL)

SIL provides youth a long-term home in an apartment. These youth are able to live in the apartment independently from the age of 16 – 21 year. SIL is the final supported living option in the continuum of care and referrals are from the Ministry of Social Services (MSS) Placement’s Unit. At the most 5 youth both male and female can reside in their own suite. These youth come to the program with a higher level of commitment to case planning, goal setting, life skills development and long-term planning. These youth receive day-to day support with a staff member however there is no staff working directly in the suite with the youth on-going. Though these youth are supported in their decision-making process they are transitioning into long-term living outside of the JHSS continuum of care. Exit plans for future living is critical in the case planning with these youth.

Bert’s Safe Shelter

The Safe Shelter provides youth a temporary placement for up to 30 days. Referrals are from the Ministry of Social Services (MSS) Placement’s Unit. These youth are male ages 12- 17 years of age. Bert’s does provide 24/7 staffing support to at the most 5 male youth. These youth come to the home with a level of resistance to services but on a voluntary basis. The goal is support these youth with where they are at, including emergency needs such as housing, addiction, family breakdown, education – to name some. Bert’s focuses on short-term concentrated case planning to prepare them for their next residence; which can include a JHSS long term home.

Basswood Place

Basswood Place provides youth a long-term home. These youth are able to live in the home from the age of 12 – 16 years. Basswood Place is a 24/7 staffed peer home and referrals are from the Ministry of Social Services (MSS) Placement’s Unit. At the most 5 male youth can reside in the home at a time. These youth come to the home with a level of commitment to case planning and goal setting however they are often waffling in a pre-contemplative/contemplation decision- making. The goal is to continue supporting these youth with where they are at while implementing long-term living plans. The youth should not require crisis intervention but rather ongoing support in the decision-making process regarding their current circumstances and plans for the future.

Jays Place

Jays Place provides youth a long-term home. These youth are able to live in the home from the age of 12-16 years. Jays Place is a Mentor model peer home and referrals are from the Ministry of Social Services (MSS) Placement’s Unit. At the most 5 male youth can reside in the home at a time. These youth come to the home with a higher level of commitment to case planning and goal setting however do require support in the decision-making process. These youth are case planning with the current circumstances and challenging their self with new goals for future growth.

Cedar House

Cedar House provides youth a long-term home. These youth are able to live in the home from the age of 16 – 21 years. Cedar House is a Mentor model peer home and referrals are from the Ministry of Social Services (MSS) Placement’s Unit. At the most 5 male youth can reside in the home at a time. These youth come to the home with a higher level of commitment to case planning, goal setting, life skills development and long-term planning. Though these youth are supported in their decision-making process they are transitioning into long-term living outside of the JHSS continuum of care. Exit plans for future living is critical in the case planning with these youth.