Citizen of the year for Moose Jaw was awarded  today and  John Howard Society of Saskatchewan is pleased to announce its Board President  received the honor.

In accepting, Christine Boyczuk, remained true to her ever humble demeanor ,while acknowledging the others who had been nominated, saying “really, they had deserved the win.”
 She said,”sometimes things look insurmountable but with a few good people, a lot of energy and hard work, conditions can improve.”
Paraphrasing from one of her favorite inspirational poems, Christine said “lots of folks like to go it alone like the eagle, but its best to be more like a flock of geese..where it much better to achieve ones goals in community.”
A contingent from JHSS was in attendance at the awards luncheon which really meant a lot to Christine.
The board and staff wish to congratulate Christine and express genuine appreciation for her leadership.

The John Howard Society of Saskatchewan wishes to recognize one of its own.

JHSS Board Chair Christine Boyczuk has been nominated as Moose Jaw Citizen of the year.

Christine was elected to JHSS Board of Directors in June 2015, serving as Vice President and Chair of the Governance Committee before becoming the President of the Board.

As a former educator, Christine has been a Language Arts Consultant, Gifted Education Consultant and Special Education Consultant, Superintendent, Assistant Director of Education and Director of Education.  Christine retired as the Regional Intersectoral Committee (RIC) Coordinator for the Moose Jaw South Central Region and currently, is the part-time Literacy Coordinator for the Moose Jaw and District Literacy Network.

Christine brings an extensive background in governance having chaired the Provincial Special Education Review for the province of Saskatchewan (Directions for Diversity). She has served on numerous boards, most notably as chair of the Provincial SIAST Board of Directors, Vice Chair, Moose Jaw YMCA Board of Directors, member of the Canadian Mental Health Association Moose Jaw Branch Board, Vice President of the Friendly City Optimist Club and an active member of the Wakamow Rotary Club.

Christine was a recipient of the provincial volunteer Centennial Medal, a SIAST Honorary Diploma, the Moose Jaw Police Community Safety Award and the PRISM Lifetime Achievement Award. Accomplishments she is proud of are the collaborations with others in establishing the Moxie Club, a program for children with Autism; implementing the HUB approach in Moose Jaw, an intervention program for at-risk individuals; implementing the Moose Jaw Drug Court; planning the Moose Jaw Family Centers and the region-wide Violence Threat Risk Assessment Protocol and Practice.

The Citizen of the Year Award coordinated by the local Chamber of Commerce will be announced on Thursday, January 18 at a luncheon which will be held at the Heritage Inn in Moose Jaw. Tickets are $30.00 and the registration deadline for this event is Tuesday, January 16. The luncheon will also feature Mayor Fraser Tolmie and his annual “State of the City” address.

On behalf of the JHSS Board of Directors, it is with sincere regret that I announce that Greg Fleet, CEO, will be on a leave of absence until further notice. We extend our very best wishes to Greg while he is away.         
 
The Board has appointed Jaime Boldt who will assume the role of interim Chief Executive Officer (CEO). 
 
From all of us on the Board, we appreciate your ongoing support, and look forward to continuing to work together in making a meaningful difference in our community. 
 
Should you have any questions, please feel free to contact Jaime Boldt at (306) 527-1415 or jboldt@sk.johnhoward.ca. Thank you. 
 
Christine Boyczuk
President of the Board
JHSS Board of Directors

About John Howard Society

The John Howard Society of Saskatchewan (JHSS) is an independent, non-profit, community-based organization that assists individuals who are at risk or are involved in the criminal justice process by providing prevention, intervention, support services and advocacy.

Make a Difference

Join our highly talented and dedicated volunteer Board of Directors. Applications are being accepted for one new Board member from the community of the Prince Albert region. Board members must demonstrate a strong desire to seek ways to serve youth and adults who are at risk or are involved in the criminal justice process by providing prevention, intervention, support services and advocacy as key candidate attributes.

Regular meetings of the Board of Directors are held at least 4 times per year with additional participation in Committee meetings and working groups. The Board abides by existing governance regulations for not-for-profit organizations, and the guidelines set out by Imagine Canada.

How to Apply

If you want to make a meaningful difference in our community, interested candidates should apply by sending a letter of interest along with a current CV or other indication of the skills the candidate is providing to Cindy Babcock, Executive Assistant at cbabcock@sk.johnhoward.ca.

Restorative Justice Week (RJW) was held across Canada, and throughout the world, November 19-26, 2017.
The theme for the week was Inspiring Innovation.

Restorative Justice Week is an opportunity to learn the values and principles of restorative justice and how restorative justice applies to a variety of situations in the criminal justice system and in every day challenges.

Restorative Justice (RJ) is a philosophy and an approach that views crime and conflict as harm done to people and relationships. It is a non-adversarial, non-retributive approach to justice that emphasizes healing in victims, accountability of offenders, and the involvement of citizens in creating healthier, safer communities. The goal is to reach meaningful, satisfying, and fair outcomes through inclusion, open communication, and truth.

Proclamation events:

Activities sponsored by the John Howard Society of Saskatchewan (JHSS) this year included acclaimed author Dr. Jerry Goebel.

Dr. Goebel is well known for his work with high-risk youth; focusing on education to reduce bullying, and decreasing teen disenfranchisement. Over the last few years, Dr. Goebel has been working with Social Services to build healthy outcomes for teens in Group Home settings. His topic will be “Engaging High-Risk Youth.”

In an interview during his Saskatoon visit, Dr. Goebels remarked on a possible strategy for helping young people to mature…

Dr Goebels also commented on Restorative Justice Week at a CTV news briefing in Saskatoon. Click here to view the interview.

Leading up to the week, JHSS spokeswomen took to the airwaves to help promote JHSS events and shed more light on what the Society does. Click here to view the interview.

Many people are unaware that JHSS provides housing and other supports for at risk youth throughout Saskatchewan.

JHSS events are intended to help bring to the attention of the public the work John Howard of Saskatchewan does with youth in our communities.  Besides outlining the positive effects of Restorative Justice, JHSS also recognized our community partnerships without which we could not thrive.

Equally important to celebrate during the week were the contributions from our dedicated staff. Many milestones were reached this past year and we honor  the following for their commitment to our association and its principles by which we are directed.

Various pictures of the week:

Both JHSS Board Chair Christine Boyczuk and CEO Greg Fleet were especially pleased with the events this year.

From Board Chair Boyczuk:

“Thank you for all the work you did to create such a successful Restorative Justice Week. I know there is benefit in celebrating what we do and the people who do it.

I really got a sense of pride in the people who work in the organization that you cannot get by being around a board table. There was a great “vibe” that I have a hard time describing. The service awards were a great idea; it demonstrates that the employee and the work they do is valued.

Thank you for this effort and all you do!”

…and from CEO Fleet:

“I wanted to take this opportunity to thank all of our staff at our Branches and Provincial Office for your coordination in the Restorative Justice Week events. We had a very successful week across the Province. Congratulations on a job well done!

Once again, congratulations to all staff on achieving this significant milestone in service to the John Howard Society of Saskatchewan.  Whether it is five, ten or fifteen years, JHSS has benefited from your dedication and commitment to service.  We very much appreciate you, and could not achieve our goals without you.

Thanks again for all that you do, and best wishes to each of you for continued success.

Warmest regards.”

And with that we wrap the 2017 edition of Restorative Justice Week. Plans are already underway for our 60th anniversary here in Saskatchewan this year; should be a wonderful time.

Restorative Justice Week activities across Canada began today. Here in Saskatchewan, the John Howard Society (JHSS) events will include Dr. Jerry Goebel who is well known for his work with high risk youth. Dr. Goebel has been working with Social Services to help build healthy outcomes for teens in group home settings, something JHSS is also involved with.
Besides outlining the positive affects of Restorative Justice, JHSS will also be recognizing our community partners without whom we would not thrive.
JHSS spokeswomen recently shed more light on the annual event during a CTV Regina interview……….

Click here to view the CTV Regina interview.

EVENTS SCHEDULED INCLUDE:

Moose Jaw-Nov.21st 11:45, 50 Caribou Street W.
Prince Albert-Nov.22nd,10:AM, 94-15th ST. E
Saskatoon-Nov.22nd, 3PM, 1120-20th St.
Regina-Nov.23rd, 8:30 AM 1651-11th Ave.

Myth: The John Howard Society is preoccupied with offenders and offers very little to victims.

Fact: The John Howard Society is a strong advocate of Restorative Justice. Restorative justice is an approach to justice that personalizes the crime by having the victims and the offenders mediate a restitution agreement to the satisfaction of each, as well as involving the community. This contrasts to more punitive approaches where the main aim is retributive justice or to satisfy abstract legal principles.
Victims take an active role in the process. Meanwhile, offenders take meaningful responsibility for their actions, taking the opportunity to right their wrongs and redeem themselves, in their own eyes and in the eyes of the community. In addition, the restorative justice approach aims to help the offender to avoid future offenses.
Restorative justice that fosters dialogue between victim and offender has shown the highest rates of victim satisfaction and offender accountability.
(Source – Wikipedia)

Our Moose Jaw branch recently completed a Victim / Offender Mediation, through the Alternative Measures Program, relating to a theft under $5000.00 charge. The mediation was most successful with both parties being able to address concerns with the victim receiving restitution for the stolen item. The accused was very happy to be able to apologize in person, as these events were out of character for him. The offender was using heavily, when the offence occurred, and the victim was able to see that the theft wasn’t personal. During our follow-up with the offender we were told that the two of them are now friends on Facebook, having continued positive contact with each other. The victim was the one that reached out to the offender and added him as a ‘friend’. Our client stated, ‘Isn’t that crazy, we are now friends’.

For more information on Restorative Justice please click on the below link.
http://www.johnhoward.on.ca/…/facts-28-restorative-justice-…

Greg Fleet
Chief Executive Officer
John Howard Society of Saskatchewan

Myth:

Most people who go to prison will spend most of their lives there.

Fact:

It is estimated that over 90% of people who are sent to prison will eventually be released to the community.
Unfortunately, there are many who will re-offend, especially when they have not been treated for mental illness and/or addictions.
Approx. 80% of those incarcerated have mental health and/or addiction problems. This tells us that treatment and rehabilitation are critical to reduce recidivism, enhance public safety and instill confidence within our corrections system. People are sent to prison as punishment, not to be punished! The absence of effective programming and lack of resources to deal with mental health and addiction issues contribute immensely to those that re-offend once released.
Effective, Just & Humane treatment of those being incarcerated will result in safer communities.

Greg Fleet
Chief Executive Officer
John Howard Society of Saskatchewan